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Anonymous

Anonymous asked:

abortion saves the lives of women

cultureshift:

There are 160,000,000 women missing on our little blue planet today because of abortion. These missing women are IN ADDITION to the women that were killed in equal numbers along with the men who would have been here today without the horror of human abortion. There are literally 160,000,000 less women than men today because of your beloved ‘right’, and it’s only getting worse. How do you think that loss of voting power is going to affect women’s rights over time?

Abortion kills women in the womb. What about their rights?

Learn more.

Okay.  I’m not usually into political stuff and, actually, I don’t consider this political at all.  It’s more of a moral issue for me.  And I’m actually okay with abortion in some cases.  SOME!  One of those cases being when the life of the mother is in danger.  But it never occurred to me just how harmful abortion actually is, specifically to women—the ones it’s supposed to be protecting.  I keep forgetting how often women are killed just BECAUSE they are women.

Climbing the Heights by Dorothy-T-Rose

Isalerin (E-saul-err-in) and her siblings often played upon the rocks or chased the elven ships, but never had they considered scaling the volcanic mountain that formed the southern wall of their nursery.  Discontent to stay within her ocean home, Isal decided she must see where the elves lived when they weren’t sailing their ships.  Against her siblings warnings, she took to the sharp rocky cliffs until she could climb no higher and had to return home, disappointed, but held in awe among her peers.  Soon more of the young serpentine folk would begin venturing to further and further realms in search of new places and wild adventures.  And this was only the first of many for Isal.

Medium: Painter X3, Painter 2015, Photoshop CS5
Completed: Aug. 18, 2014

rugessnome:

dorothytrose:

viewpr:

Transposed Tatting

Who knew that the ancient handicraft technique Tatting (also known as frivolité, and used for knotting lace) with its fragile look and decorative function in (fashion) textiles originates from the masculine world of sailors and fishermen? Right, I didn’t. That was a rediscovery made by Eveline Keyser who graduated from the Gerrit Rietveld Academy by writing a thesis on this subject and blowing new life in tatting by integrating the roots, or better said the ropes and knots, of the technique into new artwork and product design.

By using recycled shipping rope, instead of fine yarn, that Keyser collects at the port of Rotterdam, the knots automatically are bigger. And once knotted in a pattern create large lace carpets. Keyser also developed a 3D way of tying enabling her to create seating units for example. The possibilities are endless. I say a revival of tatting!

 

Lisa Telussa

This is fabulous!  Only one thing, though.  What the heck did she use for a needle or shuttle?

I almost wonder if it may have been done with the rope wound into butterflies/skeins and that used like a shuttle? 

…I finished a ring pretty much that way the other day that way when I was running out of thread. 

That is a brilliant idea!  I’m going to have to remember that!  Thank you!

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